Overlooked America – Delaware

 

We love exploring America’s back roads and small towns and finding overlooked gems that the tourist brochures never cover. In a series of weekly blog posts we will be sharing some of America’s lesser-known small town museums, historic sites, and oddball attractions, on a state-by-state basis. We don’t have room to cover each and every attraction in every state, but hope to give you some ideas for places to see your travels.

Delaware City: Over 33,000 Confederate prisoners of war were imprisoned at Fort Delaware, a hellhole of a place where 2,700 died from exposure and disease.

Dover: The Delaware Agriculture Museum and Village honors two centuries of farm life with displays of old farming equipment, tractors dating back to the 1600s, a farmhouse, one room school, and other historic buildings.

Dover: Located at Dover Air Force Base, the Air Mobility Command Museum tells the story of air tanker and military airlift operations. The museum displays include a base operations office, over 25 historic aircraft, and exhibits on airplane nose art.

Dover: At the Johnson Victrola Museum you can see a huge collection of old records, phonographs and other memorabilia relating to the Victor Talking Machine Company, which got its start in Delaware.

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Dover: At the Delaware State Police Museum and Education Center you can learn about the men and women who serve in the State Police with displays of weapons, uniforms, and equipment.

Dover: The John Dickinson Plantation was the home of Samuel Dickinson, a wealthy Quaker tobacco planter and merchant. Today the plantation is a 1700s living history museum with costumed interpreters and period displays.

Frederica: The Bowers Beach Maritime Museum tells the story of Delaware’s coastal history. The museum offers information on Delaware Bay, the local watermen of the area, and displays artifacts from the town of Bowers Beach.

Georgetown: The Delaware Aviation Museum displays vintage aircraft and aviation artifacts, including a World War II B-25 bomber.

Constellation

Georgetown: The Nutter D. Marvel Carriage Museum displays a fine collection of antique carriages as well as the many original, restored buildings on the museum property, including a one room school built in 1833.

Harrington: The Messick Agricultural Museum displays antique tractors and other farming equipment.

Millsboro: The Nanticoke Indian Museum tells the story of the Nanticoke Indian tribe with displays of jewelry, pottery, spears, and arrow points, along with demonstrations of traditional crafts and skills.

Lewes: The Lightship Overfalls was the last lightship built for the U.S. Lighthouse Service. Now docked along the canal front in historic Lewes, the Overfalls Lightship Maritime Museum is open on weekends during the summer and visitors can take a guided tour above and below decks.

LIghtship Overfalls

Rehoboth Beach: In the 1870s Rehoboth Beach was a center for camp meetings, and the Anna Hazzard Museum is housed in one of the original "tent" houses from that period. The museum displays artifacts and photographs from the town’s days as a religious camp meeting destination.

Wilmington: At the Delaware Museum of Natural History you can see life-sized dinosaurs, explore beneath the seas, experience an African watering hole, marvel at the diversity of birds and shells from around the world and more.

Wilmington: The Delaware Sports Museum and Hall of Fame honors the heroes in Delaware sports, past and present.

So far, over 250 readers have entered this week’s Free Drawing for an autographed copy of Terry’s popular cookbook, Miss Terry’s Kitchen. To enter, all you have to do is click on this Free Drawing link or the tab at the top of this page and enter your name in the comments section at the bottom of that page (not this one). Only one entry per person per drawing please, and you must enter with your real name. To prevent spam or multiple entries, the names of cartoon or movie characters are not allowed. The winner will be drawn Sunday evening.

CoverTerry

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