Nick Russell

Oct 202014
 

Yesterday afternoon I finished the new issue of the Gypsy Journal and then Terry spent several hours giving it a final proofing before I uploaded it to the printer’s web server last night. We have a few days to relax before it gets shipped back to us, so is it time to play yet? I sure hope so, I’ve been chained to my desk for too long.

I think today we’ll spend some time exploring Hilton Head Island. There’s no way we can be this close to a beach and not go check it out, right? Although it’s cooled down noticeably, so there probably won’t be many skimpy bikinis to see. Not that I’d notice anyway, being a married man and all.

We originally planned to be here at Hilton Head Island Motorcoach Resort for a week, but yesterday our hosts sent a message that they won’t be here until early November, so I think we’ll stay longer. I can’t think of a nicer place to hang out for a while, can you?

Anybody who knows me is well aware that I’m not a techy kind of guy, so my author friend Stephen Arseneault has been helping me tweak the keywords and categories for my books on Amazon and it has shown an immediate impact. Life is good! Thanks for all of your help Stephen. It’s much appreciated.

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Well, it would be if I could get over my darned identity crisis and figure out who I really am. As another author pal of mine, Bobbi Holmes, who writes the popular Haunting Danielle mystery series, asks in her blog Will the real Nick Russell please stand up. Actually, I contacted this fellow last winter and tried to straighten up his misinformation, and as I wrote in a blog post then titled Delusions of Grandeur, he quickly put me in my place. I write fiction for a living, but you can’t make this stuff up!

Congratulations to Nancy Scigliano, this week’s winner of our drawing for an audiobook of Suzie O’Connell’s Mountain Angel. We had 83 entries in the drawing. Stay tuned, because another one starts soon.

Yesterday I got an e-mail about a new mobile app called GoMechanic, which is advertised to be able to find a dealership or mobile RV mechanic anywhere in the United States, within a (50) mile radius of where you are GPS located. The information with it says that there are over 10,000 service providers listed for everything from detailing to oil changes, tire replacement, window tinting, locksmithing, etc. It’s available free for Android and on iTunes. Check it out.

Thought For The Day – A hero is no braver than an ordinary man, but he is braver five minutes longer. – Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Almost Done

 Posted by at 12:01 am  Nick's Blog
Oct 192014
 

Except for our trip here from Morehead City, I’ve spent the last few days working on the new issue of the Gypsy Journal and it’s almost done. All that’s left is to drop in Terry’s recipe column and for her to give it a final proofread.

I think our readers are really going to enjoy this issue. It’s packed with plenty of interesting stories, including Ulysses S. Grant’s boyhood home, Loveland Castle in Ohio, the Derry Church Session House, the Shoe House, the Conrad Weiser Homestead, a stop by stop description of the Gettysburg Battlefield auto tour route, a feature on Roadside America, the tale of a haunted bridge, and profiles of abolitionist Sojourner Truth and Robert Wadlow, the gentle giant of Alton, Illinois. And that doesn’t include our regular items like letters from our readers and some of Terry’s great recipes. If you haven’t subscribed yet, click here or the link at the bottom of this page and we’ll get you on our mailing list.

Between proofing stories as I cranked them out and helping me get the exposure on the photos right, Terry was busy with a new weaving project. And she still found time to make one of her delicious pizzas for dinner! Actually two, a white pizza with pepperoni for me and regular pizza with lots of veggies for her. And we have enough left over for another dinner!

There is a lot to see and do here on Hilton Head Island, so once we get the new issue finished and uploaded to our printer’s web server, it will be time to get out and play. We are lighthouse aficionados, so seeing the Harbour Town Lighthouse is high on our list. Though it’s relatively new (opened in 1970), it’s a popular landmark. And how can we be on an island and not go to the beach? And I suspect that sooner or later we will be forced to sample some of the local seafood, just to say we did. Yeah, it’s a tough gig, but somebody has to do it.

Here’s a bit of Hilton Head trivia for you. When the famous American Revolution warship USS Constitution, popularly known as Old Ironsides, was rebuilt in 1997, they used wood from Hilton Head live oak trees that were felled during construction of the Cross Island Parkway. Now remember, if you win a gazillion dollars on Jeopardy with that information, I want my cut!

Today is your last chance to enter this week’s Free Drawing for an audiobook of my friend Suzie O’Connell’s Mountain Angel, the first book in her popular Northstar Angels romance series. To enter, all you have to do is click on the Free Drawing link or the tab at the top of this page and enter your name in the comments section at the bottom of that page (not this one). Only one entry per person per drawing please, and you must enter with your real name. To prevent spam or multiple entries, the names of cartoon or movie characters are not allowed. The winner will be drawn this evening.

Mountain Angel

Thought For The Day – Thanks to the Interstate Highway System, it is now possible to travel across the country from coast to coast without seeing anything. – Charles Kuralt

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Oct 182014
 

We were pretty worn out from waking up early and our nearly 400 mile trip Thursday, so we slept soundly our first night here at Hilton Head Island Motorcoach Resort. I’d have liked to have slept in a little bit yesterday morning, but was awakened to the sound of a maintenance guy trimming the brush around our RV site this morning. But what the heck, a place this big takes a lot of work to keep it looking good.

And it really does look good, from the well-groomed entry to the interior roads to the campsites.

Hilton Head Resort sign

Hilton Head road 2

Hilton Head road

This is a member-owned resort and the sites are very nice.

Hilton Head RV site 2

Hilton Head RV site 3

Hilton Head RV site

Here is the site we are parked on, which is owned by friends of ours. Once I get the new issue of the Gypsy Journal finished, I plan to spend some time under that umbrella just watching the world go by.

Winnie at Hilton Head

The resort has every amenity you could ever want, from a large temperature controlled pool to a heated spa, lounge, fully-equipped exercise room, modern laundry facilities, luxury tile and marble bath facilities with private shower rooms, six tennis courts, a basketball court, shuffleboard, miles of paved bike and walking paths, and a dog park. All this and it’s just a short walk or bike ride to the beach! Can you tell I like this place?

Something else I like is food, but you all knew that, right? I’m not a sushi kind of guy, but when I hear about a good Chinese buffet I’m right there. So when I found Vari Asian Seafood & Sushi Buffet on Yelp, I was looking forward to trying it. We arrived a few minutes after 5 on Friday afternoon and there were only two other customers, never a good sign. But we decided to give it a try anyway and were very glad we did. The hot and sour soup was very tasty, the fried rice was excellent, and everything else on the buffet table was very good. Service was fast and friendly. It’s well worth a return trip.

Have you entered this week’s Free Drawing yet? This week’s prize is an audiobook of my friend Suzie O’Connell’s Mountain Angel, the first book in her popular Northstar Angels romance series. To enter, all you have to do is click on the Free Drawing link or the tab at the top of this page and enter your name in the comments section at the bottom of that page (not this one). Only one entry per person per drawing please, and you must enter with your real name. To prevent spam or multiple entries, the names of cartoon or movie characters are not allowed. The winner will be drawn Sunday evening.

Mountain Angel

If you are a science fiction fan, I’ve got some good news for you. My friend Stephen Arseneault just released OMEGA Exile, the first book in his new Omega series, which is a follow-up series to his popular eight-book AMP series. Check it out on Amazon

Thought For The Day – Be a traveler, not a tourist. Try new things, meet new people, and look beyond what’s right in front of you. Those are the keys to understanding this amazing world we live in. – Andrew Zimmern

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Oct 172014
 

First of all, I want to thank everybody for your birthday greetings on the blog, by e-mail and on Facebook. You all make me feel very special. And speaking of birthdays and special people, today is our friend Elaine Loscher’s birthday. It’s never polite to ask a lady her age, but I’m pretty sure Elaine is almost old enough to buy a drink. And since she’s married to my buddy Mike, who could blame her if she did? Smile

We woke up earlier than usual yesterday morning because we had a lot of miles to cover. By 9:15 we were on the road, which I think may be a record for us. We usually leave somewhere around the crack of noon.

We took U.S. Highway 17 south to Wilmington, most of it excellent divided four-lane highway, and after navigating through a snarl of narrow construction zones we got onto U.S. Highway 74 and followed it west to Whiteville, where we picked up U.S. 76 and took it into South Carolina. It ranged between nice four-lane highway to rather narrow two-lane road in a few short sections, and we had to slow down for a couple of small towns, but it was an easy ride. At Florence we got onto Interstate 95 for 156 miles, the longest we’ve driven on an interstate in a couple of months. We left the superslab and took U.S. 278 east to Hilton Head Island Motorcoach Resort, arriving at 5:10 p.m. with 396 miles behind us.

This is our first time to Hilton head, and I have to say that we are very impressed with what we’ve seen of the resort so far. We were scheduled to arrive here on Wednesday, but due to the bad weather I had called and spoke to a very nice lady named Tracy and told her I needed to move up our reservation by a day, at least, until the storm had passed. Yesterday morning when I called to tell her we were on our way, Tracy said the office closed at 5 p.m., and that she would call about 3 to see how our trip was going. When she did, I told her that we were on our way but would arrive a little after closing time. She said no problem and that she would keep the office open until we arrived. How nice!

Tracy greeted us and got us checked in and then we were escorted to our site. This is a very nice place and everybody we have met has been super friendly. Driving to our site folks waved and said hello, and once we were parked a nice couple named Joey and Leslie were walking by and stopped and chatted with us for a while. None of the snootiness we’ve experienced at some upscale RV resorts.

By the time we got the utilities hooked up, the rooftop satellite TV dish aimed, and the motorhome set up it was dark, so we did not see much of the resort, but what we saw, we liked. I’ll have some pictures in tomorrow’s blog.

Big news out of Elkhart, Indiana. My buddy Al Hesselbart, historian for the RV Museum has announced his retirement. Al has talked about retirement for a while now, but since he’s the world’s acknowledged expert on the history of the RV industry, he was having too much fun playing with the antique RVs at the museum and sharing his wealth of knowledge with anyone who came through the door. He has been an excellent resource for anybody researching the RV world, and his book The Dumb Things Sold…Just like that is interesting reading for anybody who has ever set foot inside a recreational vehicle. Al tells me he plans to spend time traveling in his vintage Newell motorhome and chasing fish from Michigan to Florida. Congratulations on your retirement, Al. I look forward to casting a line with you one of these days, buddy.

Al Hesselbart

And more big news, this time on wireless internet access for RVers. Yesterday, Millenicom announced that Verizon is acquiring all Millenicom customer accounts. Technomadia’s Cherie Ve Ard, writing on the RV Mobile Internet Resource Center, said that Verizon will be contacting Millenicom’s customers to tell them what their plan options will be. Where does that leave Mellinicom customers who have used their service to save money on wireless internet? Cherie says nobody knows at this point. The RV Mobile Internet Resource Center has an interesting report online titled Cellular Data ‘Wars’ – Guide to Picking Your Plans that you might find interesting.

Have you entered this week’s Free Drawing yet? This week’s prize is an audiobook of my friend Suzie O’Connell’s Mountain Angel, the first book in her popular Northstar Angels romance series. To enter, all you have to do is click on the Free Drawing link or the tab at the top of this page and enter your name in the comments section at the bottom of that page (not this one). Only one entry per person per drawing please, and you must enter with your real name. To prevent spam or multiple entries, the names of cartoon or movie characters are not allowed. The winner will be drawn Sunday evening.

Mountain Angel

Thought For The Day – If fifty million people say a foolish thing, it is still a foolish thing. – Bertrand Russell

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Oct 162014
 

If we look like we are sporting nice suntans the next time you see us, take a closer look because it’s not what it seems. What you are actually seeing is rust. Yeah, it rained that much yesterday.

The storm that has been raging across the country had lost a lot of its momentum by the time it reached Morehead City, but it still had plenty of rain with it. Lots and lots of rain. It started coming down a little after midnight and continued all day yesterday. It was pounding so hard on the roof of our motorhome that when my daughter-in-law Geli called from Alabama to wish me happy birthday, we didn’t even hear the phone ring!

Except for a quick trip to the post office and to pick up a few things at the store, we spent the day at home and I worked on the new issue of the Gypsy Journal while Terry was busy with bookkeeping and making me a delicious dinner of anchovy garlic aioli. Yummy! And for dessert, she made a chocolate birthday cake with chocolate cream frosting! Double yummy!

Birthday Cake

By 9 p.m. the storm had passed on out to sea, leaving puddles everywhere. I know because I stepped in one and soaked my shoe and foot with cold water.

Today we will be back on the road, headed for Hilton Head Island Motorcoach Resort in South Carolina. Friends have an RV lot there and have offered us the use of it for a while and we’re looking forward to checking it out. It’s almost 400 miles, and if we get an early start we should be able to make it. For the most part we’ve been limiting our traveling days to under 200 miles for the last couple of months, but I want to get there and get set up so I can concentrate on finishing the new issue of the paper to get it to our printer by our Monday deadline.

Hopefully, once that’s done we will have some time to explore Hilton Head. We may even get some kite flying done. Terry hasn’t had her new Revolution EXP in the air yet, and I think it’s about time, don’t you?

Have you entered this week’s Free Drawing yet? This week’s prize is an audiobook of my friend Suzie O’Connell’s Mountain Angel, the first book in her popular Northstar Angels romance series. To enter, all you have to do is click on this Free Drawing link or the tab at the top of this page and enter your name in the comments section at the bottom of that page (not this one). Only one entry per person per drawing please, and you must enter with your real name. To prevent spam or multiple entries, the names of cartoon or movie characters are not allowed. The winner will be drawn Sunday evening.

Mountain Angel

Thought For The Day – You have to experience the darkness before you can appreciate the light.

Check Out Nick’s E-Books In Our E-Book Store

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Oct 152014
 

We had planned to leave Morehead City today and continue our southward journey, but a nasty storm system tracking through the country is bringing lots of wind and rain to this region of the coast, so we’re going to stay here until it passes through. It’s part of that flexibility that all fulltime RVers have to pack with them when they hit the road.

We’ve known a few who couldn’t do that; they traveled on tight self-imposed schedules and when some breakdown or weather delay threw off their timelines they could not adapt. Folks like that don’t last long out here.

It’s just as well. I’ll take advantage of the downtime to get more done on the new issue of the paper so I can have it to our printer next Monday. That’s pretty much what I did all day yesterday, while Terry caught up on her paperwork and got a couple of orders ready to mail out.

RV fires are terrible things, but they do happen. That’s why I always tell people to be sure to attend one of Mac McCoy’s fire safety seminars at RV rallies. We had two small fires in our bus conversion, and both times Terry was able to quickly extinguish them before they got any bigger. Yesterday, longtime reader Jim Hamm sent me this picture of a friend’s motorhome that caught fire in Kingman, Arizona. It looks like it started in the generator compartment. Fortunately, Jim said his friends escaped without harm.

Motorhome fire Kingman Jim Hamm

Last week’s BookBub promotion for Big Lake was very successful, with almost 75,000 free copies downloaded. I’m seeing a noticeable increase in sales of the other four books in the Big Lake series and some very nice reviews.

Don’t mess with authors! My cousin Nora Knople in Ohio sent me a picture of this shirt. I need about six of them, if Omar the Tentmaker can crank up production.

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It’s Wednesday, which means it’s time to start a new Free Drawing. This week’s prize is an audiobook of my friend Suzie O’Connell’s Mountain Angel, the first book in her popular Northstar Angels romance series. To enter, all you have to do is click on the Free Drawing link or the tab at the top of this page and enter your name in the comments section at the bottom of that page (not this one). Only one entry per person per drawing please, and you must enter with your real name. To prevent spam or multiple entries, the names of cartoon or movie characters are not allowed. The winner will be drawn Sunday evening.

Mountain Angel

Another of my author pals, Cleve Sylcox, is currently offering his mystery Death, In Gravely Falls: Sometimes, Justice Isn’t Enough free on Amazon. Fictional Gravely Falls, Colorado sits on the outskirts of ski country with beautiful views, wonderful landscapes… and murder. Check it out and leave a review.

Thought For The Day – Everything is changing. People are taking comedians seriously and the politicians as a joke. – Will Rogers

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Oct 142014
 

In a blog post a few days ago I wrote that I had crossed something off my bucket list by catching a saltwater fish from the pier in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina. But somebody said it wasn’t official, since a fellow who was fishing actually hooked the fish and then handed me the pole. And Al Hesselbart, whom I defer to on all things concerning antique RVs (because he’s an antique RVer himself), claimed that the fish was foul hooked because he didn’t see a hook in its mouth. (There was, but when you get to be Al’s age your eyesight starts to go, along with a lot of other things.)

Well, now it’s official. We went back to the pier yesterday, and on the very first cast with my brand new Ugly Stik fishing rod combo, I hooked this lizardfish. They are ugly and have a mouth full of sharp teeth, but it’s a fish, and I hooked it myself, right in the mouth!

Lizardfish

We spent several hours on the pier, most of the time casting Gotcha plugs. The fishing wasn’t as good as it was when we were on the pier watching other anglers the other day, but I did manage to catch one very nice bluefish.

Nick with bluefish

Eventually all that casting was making my arms and back talk to me, and what they were saying wasn’t very nice, so I switched to bottom fishing and caught a few small pinfish that were about half the size of some of the stuff I used to have in my aquarium.

Meanwhile, Miss Terry was still casting away, and as the afternoon wore on I was really hoping that she’d catch at least one fish. I suggested she switch to a bottom rig too, so she’d have something to reel in, but she was determined and kept right on casting. And not too long before sunset she landed a nice bluefish of her own! That’s my girl!

Terry with bluefish

Bluefish are voracious predators that will hit anything that moves, and it was evidenced with Terry’s fish. When we were taking the lure out of its lip Terry discovered that it had another small fish in its mouth!

There are not many places on the east coast where you can watch the sunset over the Atlantic Ocean, but because of a sharp curve on the coastline we got this pretty view from the pier.

Atlantic Beach sunset 2

We fished until after dark, when we were too tired to cast any more and our stomachs were complaining. Then we called it a day, with sore muscles and some beautiful memories.

When they read we were going to be in this area, a couple of blog readers recommended we try the shrimp burger at a little place called El’s Drive-in. Then while we were on the pier, somebody else told us to check it out. With that many people saying the same thing, we decided to take their advice on our way home from the pier. El’s is a little place and you get your food to go or eat in your car, and all I can say is wow! The food was fantastic and the service fast and friendly. I wish we would have stopped here our first night in town.

Eels Drive in

We have enjoyed our time here in Morehead City. It’s a place I could live, if I had to live in just one place. Small town friendliness, but all of the services you need, and the ocean at your doorstep. Yes, it gets hot and humid in the summer, and yes, they get hurricanes. But California has earthquakes and other places have different things that can kill you. As my old man used to say, you pays your money and you takes your chances. But, as fulltime RVers, the great thing is that we don’t have to live in just one place.

Thought For The Day – Sooner or later everyone sits down to a banquet of consequences. – Robert Louis Stevenson

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Oct 132014
 

Note: We are revisiting some of our favorite old places that we’ve been to before, and sharing some of their stories again from our previous visits.

At the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort, we found an impressive collection of nautical exhibits that tell the story of North Carolina’s seafaring past, and how it has affected the state’s history and culture. The museum’s mission is to interpret North Carolina’s coastal cultural heritage and its natural and maritime history through collections, research, exhibits, and educational programs, and it does an excellent job of it.

Since before the Revolutionary War, North Carolina’s 300 miles of coastline, her fragile offshore barrier islands, her rivers and sounds have provided people with refuge from the Atlantic’s wicked storms, supported commerce, and offered up a bounty of seafood for commercial and sports fishermen. Over the years the coast’s bays and inlets have been a sanctuary for pirates, British and Union raiders, and smugglers. The Maritime Museum tells these stories and more.

Pirate

The infamous pirate Blackbeard operated in these waters, and the museum has a display of artifacts recovered from the wreck of Blackbeard’s flagship, the Queen Anne’s Revenge, including this cannon. The wreck was discovered in 1996, in 25 feet of water just off the coast.

Blackbeard cannon

The museum has several working boats on display, including a replica of an Indian dugout canoe made from a cypress log, a flat-bottom skiff used in the shallow rivers and sounds of coastal North Carolina in the late 1800s and early 1900s, and Spritsail sailing skiff built in 1910.

Flatbottom skiff

There is an extensive collection of equipment used on ships on display, including a ship’s wheel from a trading vessel that sailed in North Carolina’s sounds and rivers in the late 1800s and early 1900s, lamps, anchors, nets, and radio equipment. A ship’s telegraph on display originally came from a World War I German destroyer that the U.S. Navy captured in the Pacific and converted into a submarine support vessel. The ship was rammed and sunk off Morehead City by a fruit transport, and Navy divers retrieved the telegraph.

Ship wheel 2

Commercial fishing, from whaling to oystering, has played a major role in shaping the region for centuries, and the Shackleford Banks, located just a few miles away, was the center of whaling activities in North Carolina. Whalers hunted whales as they migrated along the coast, harpooning them from the same small boats that they used for mullet fishing, or they waited for whales to beach themselves.

Rope and casks

Whale fishing was sporadic, and while it continued into the 20th century, it was seasonal and only one of the many activities that helped the "Bankers" make a living. A small whaleboat model with lines, harpoons, and oars to scale, on display in the museum, is a design similar to the small rowing vessels used for whaling on the Shackleford Banks.

New England whalers with large whaling ships settled on North Carolina’s barrier islands in the 1700s. The Wanderer model on display is typical of the New England whaling vessels that visited North Carolina during the whaling season in the 1800s.

Oystering and menhaden fishing were both important to the region’s economy, and displays on these industries include model ships and boats, as well as fishing equipment used by commercial fishermen. While the industry started with wooden boats, today most menhaden fishing boats have steel hulls and are converted World War II minesweepers or submarine chasers.

The waters off the North Carolina coast can be treacherous, and they have claimed many a fisherman and sailor. The lifesaving efforts of the United States Lighthouse Service, Life-Saving Service, Revenue Cutter Service, Steamboat Inspection Service, and Coast Guard are honored with a series of exhibits and panels telling the stories of the brave men and women who dedicate their lives to saving others. Many coastal people today are the descendants of the lifesavers and lighthouse keepers of the Outer Banks. Exhibits in this part of the museum include dioramas, a breech buoy used to transport men from a sinking vessel, and a Fresnel lighthouse lens, used to guide ships through hazardous waters.

Diving is also a major industry locally, from working on the bottom of fishing boats and commercial ships, to underwater structural work, and shipwreck recovery. Displays at the museum include pumps used to supply air to divers, and an underwater observation bell used in the late 1900s to investigate wrecks and underwater structures, like offshore oil derricks. The bell was lowered and raised with cables from the deck of a ship.

In addition to its extensive exhibits, the museum has a research library that contains books, documents, and newspapers covering the region’s nautical history.

Whether you enjoy history, outdoor sports, or just the opportunity to learn about the people of the area you are visiting, you’re sure to find plenty to appreciate at the North Carolina Maritime Museum.

The North Carolina Maritime Museum is located at 315 Front Street in Beaufort. The museum is open every day of the year, except for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. The museum’s hours are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays, and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Admission to the museum is free.

We had 341 entries in this weeks drawing for our 8-in-1 E-book, which includes our Guide to Free Campgrounds and Overnight Parking Spots, Fairgrounds Camping Guide, RVers’ Guide to Casino Parking, Guide to Public RV Dump Stations, Favorite Restaurants Guide, Hitching Post Campground Reviews Guide, WiFi Campground Guide, and Guide to RV Good Guys. Congratulations to this week’s winner, Bernie Patton. Stay tuned, a new contest starts soon.

Thought For The Day – The greatest right in the world is the right to be wrong.

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Oct 122014
 

Note: We are revisiting some of our favorite old places that we’ve been before, and sharing some of their stories again from our previous visits.

As most regular readers know, Terry and I enjoy exploring old cemeteries. Whenever you think your life is rough, just spend an hour or so wandering through a cemetery reading the headstones, especially the older ones, and it will help you put your life in perspective.

We have found some tragic stories in old cemeteries, of course. Especially the graves of so many children who died at a very young age, back in the days when infant mortality was so high. But we have also seen some gravestones and learned some stories that have left us mystified, and a few have even made us chuckle.

Beaufort, North Carolina has been home to seamen, pirates, soldiers, and settlers since the early 1700s, so there is a lot of history here, and much of it can be found at the Old Burying Grounds. A self-guided tour is a good way to get to know the old cemetery.

Old Burying Ground Gate

Old Burying Ground 8

One grave is that of a British naval officer who refused to lie down in rebel territory, so he was buried standing up, so he could salute King George!

British Naval officer 2

Of course there are many sad stories associated with the old cemetery, one of the worst being that of Vienna Dill, a two year old girl who died of yellow fever in 1865. She was buried in a glass-topped coffin, and local legend says that many years later the grave was dug up by vandals and her body appeared to be intact. But, as the story goes, when they forced the casket open, her body disintegrated.

Another story of a child is that of the grave of an unknown little girl who was born in England in the 1700s but brought to Beaufort as an infant. She grew up hearing stories of her family’s homeland and longed to see it with her own eyes. When her father made a trip back to London she begged to be allowed to accompany him, and the father promised his wife he would bring the child home safely. Unfortunately, she died on the voyage home. Rather than allow her to be buried at sea, her grief-stricken father purchased a barrel of rum from the ship’s captain and placed her body inside it to bring her home as promised. Even today, visitors to the cemetery leave toys and trinkets upon her grave.

Girl in the Barrel

This grave is the final resting place of Captain Otway Burns, one of the most successful privateers of the War of 1812. On one voyage alone, Captain Burns and the crew of his ship Snapdragon captured over $2 million worth of British cargo. After he died, a cannon from his ship was mounted on top of his tomb.

Otway Burns

Two stories at the Old Burying Ground are of love lost and found. After Sarah Gibbs’ first husband was lost at sea, she remarried and had a child with her second husband. Several years later her first husband returned and wanted his wife back. Understandably, her current husband wasn’t too keen on that idea, so the three of them worked out a deal. Sarah remained with her second husband, but when she died, she was buried beside her first husband so that they could be together for eternity.

Sarah Gibbs 2

The other story is that of Nancy Manney French, who fell in love with her tutor as a young girl. Her father disapproved, so the tutor, Charles French, went west to seek his fortune, vowing to return for Nancy someday. He eventually settled in Arizona and became a chief justice. Charles French faithfully wrote letters to his beloved back in Beaufort, but the local postmaster was a friend of Nancy’s father, so he intercepted them and they were never delivered. Just before the postmaster died, many years later, he needed to clear his conscience, so he told her what he had done. Nancy had never married, and as an old man Charles French returned to Beaufort and found her dying of consumption. The lifelong lovers were finally married, and Nancy died just a few weeks later.

Nancy French 3

Today is your last chance to enter this week’s Free Drawing. This week’s prize is our 8-in-1 E-book, which includes our Guide to Free Campgrounds and Overnight Parking Spots, Fairgrounds Camping Guide, RVers’ Guide to Casino Parking, Guide to Public RV Dump Stations, Favorite Restaurants Guide, Hitching Post Campground Reviews Guide, WiFi Campground Guide, and Guide to RV Good Guys. To enter, all you have to do is click on the Free Drawing link or the tab at the top of this page and enter your name in the comments section at the bottom of that page (not this one). Only one entry per person per drawing please, and you must enter with your real name. To prevent spam or multiple entries, the names of cartoon or movie characters are not allowed. The winner will be drawn this evening.

I have a couple of books to tell you about today. My friend Ken Rossignol has just released a new photo tour book, Ninety-Nine Cent Tour of Bar Harbor Maine. We’re hoping to get back up to Bar Harbor again one of these days, and I’ll be studying this one before we go!

And if you’re as overwhelmed by electronic gadgets as I am, you’re going to be thrilled that my buddy Randall Morris is offering his Explanations and Advice for the Tech Illiterate Volume II free today on Amazon! Get yourself a copy while you can.

Thought For The Day – Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak. Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen. – Winston Churchill

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Unresolved Conflicts

 Posted by at 12:02 am  Nick's Blog
Oct 112014
 

In a blog about being two-gether that I wrote few months ago, I said that communication and compromise are necessary to work out problems in any relationship, and especially for an RVing couple. I think that many times problems arise because someone doesn’t understand what their partner needs or wants, and this may be because of a lack of communication.

Is the person who isn’t getting what they need telling their partner what it is? Sometimes I tease Miss Terry and tell her I can read books, magazines, and even internet porn, but I can’t read minds. I can’t do what you want unless you tell me what it is, right?

But what if they do express their needs or concerns and the other person refuses to change or compromise? Then you get unresolved conflicts, and sooner or later something has to change or there may be an unpleasant explosion.

Here are a couple of examples from recent e-mails I have received.

The first was from a woman who said she and her husband have not sold their home yet but it’s on the market and they have been on the road since Memorial Day. She wrote that she wants to love fulltiming, but her husband is spoiling it for her because he (in her words) “won’t spend a nickel.”

She said that even without selling the house they are very comfortable financially, but in the almost five months they have been on the road, they have never spent a night in a campground. Several weeks were spent in driveways of various friends and relatives, and the rest of the time it’s been truck stops, rest areas, and WalMart parking lots. She said she is tired of living on 15 amp electric, or no electric if they are blacktop boondocking, tired of quick Navy showers, and would love to sit outside under their fifth wheel’s awning and enjoy campground life.

Her husband’s position is, why should he have to waste money on a campground when they have a self-contained RV and that “money doesn’t grow on trees.” She said she has told him she doesn’t want to spend the rest of her life living like that, but that he is delighted about not spending any more than they have to. He is looking forward to getting out to Arizona to boondock in the desert for months on end and she is dreading it.

In the second scenario, it was the husband who was frustrated. He wrote that they have been fulltiming for two years now, and that a few months ago his wife decided she wanted a dog. Actually, two dogs, and she acquired a pair of small ones.

He said he is okay with the dogs, even though he would prefer not to have to worry about cutting day trips short to get home to take care of them. The problem is that his wife was the one who wanted the dogs, but he is the one who has to walk them and clean up after them.

As he wrote, “She can spend hours walking through a flea market or shopping with no problem, but every time the dogs need walked she is suddenly too tired or her feet hurt, or she’s too busy. I didn’t want the dogs, but I’m the one up at 5 a.m. walking them in the rain or cold or whatever, while she’s still in our nice warm bed. I’m the one slapping mosquitoes while the dogs take their time finding just the perfect spot to do their business and picking up after them/” He said that he has told her he’s not happy with the situation, but her reply is they are his dogs too.

I did not know what kind of advice to give these people. I don’t see the RV lifestyle working out for either couple as things are now. What are your thoughts?

We have received almost 300 entries in this week’s Free Drawing for our 8-in-1 E-book, which includes our Guide to Free Campgrounds and Overnight Parking Spots, Fairgrounds Camping Guide, RVers’ Guide to Casino Parking, Guide to Public RV Dump Stations, Favorite Restaurants Guide, Hitching Post Campground Reviews Guide, WiFi Campground Guide, and Guide to RV Good Guys. To enter, all you have to do is click on the Free Drawing link or the tab at the top of this page and enter your name in the comments section at the bottom of that page (not this one). Only one entry per person per drawing please, and you must enter with your real name. To prevent spam or multiple entries, the names of cartoon or movie characters are not allowed. The winner will be drawn Sunday evening.

Thought For The Day – While we are free to choose our actions, we are not free to choose the consequences of our actions. – Stephen Covey

Check Out Nick’s E-Books In Our E-Book Store

Click Here For Back Issues Of The Gypsy Journal

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