Up Early And On The Go

 Posted by at 12:53 am  Nick's Blog
Nov 202016
 

Yesterday was a busy day that started way too early for us. Terry was up at 7:30, while I slept in an extra hour, and we were out the door by 9 o’clock. Our first stop was the small flea market in Oak Hill, just a few miles south of us. The neighbor who loaned us the long handled dip nets that we used to catch shrimp a few days ago said there was a vendor at the flea market who sells the nets and other shrimping equipment and we wanted to check it out.



As it turned out, the vendor wasn’t there. There probably weren’t more than a dozen or maybe fifteen vendors total. But Terry did find some fresh produce and purchased it, and we were told that the person selling the shrimping equipment will be there today. So I guess will be up early again, two days in a row. When will the madness ever stop?

I have wanted a pontoon boat for a long time, and I still do. But a lot of people who know the local waters of the Indian River and Mosquito Lagoon tell me that it might not be the best choice for us. There is a lot of what they call skinny water here, which means shallow water, and several people have said that a flats boat or shallow draft bay boat would be a better option for fishing. I had found one that sounded good on Craigslist in Daytona Beach. The seller said it was in great shape, needed absolutely nothing, and was ready to go fishing. And after running it by my pal Al Hesselbart and getting the thumbs up, we decided to have a look.



But as it turned out, it was a piece of junk. There were cracks in the fiberglass on the deck in front of the console, the upholstery was badly worn, pieces of the plastic sides of the seat mount and center console were broken or missing, the battery compartment hatch hinges were broken, none of the gauges worked, and there were no navigation lights. We walked away while the seller was still telling us what a great deal it was. Oh well, when the right boat comes along, at the right price, we’ll know it.

Since we were already in Daytona Beach, we visited a couple of used furniture stores, looking for more oak bookcases (you can never have too many bookcases or too many books). At one store we found three nice ones and I was able to negotiate a heck of a price on them. Terry was also looking for a drop leaf table to use in her sewing room, but no luck there.

We stopped to get a bite to eat, then went to Staples and bought a desk chair for Terry to replace the worn out, uncomfortable task chair she has been using. Then we went to Books A Million, because like I said, you can never have too many books.

On the way home we remembered it was auction night in Oak Hill, and they were supposed to have a bunch of furniture from an estate. But as it turned out, I got some misinformation and it will be another week or two before that stuff goes on sale.

While we were wandering through the auction hall I heard someone call my name, but since we don’t know very many people around here, I assumed whoever it was meant another Nick. But as we were leaving, I heard my name called again and turned to see a gentleman approaching us with a book in his hand (do you see a theme with today’s blog?). He introduced himself as long time reader Mr Ed, who frequently makes comments on the blog. He lives south of here and said, “I know you like books, so here you go.” It was a large book called Waterways and Byways of the Indian River Lagoon. It’s full of color photos of the local wildlife and fish, as well as satellite photographs of the entire region. How cool is that? Thanks, Mr. Ed. I love it!

Unfortunately, we didn’t get to talk for very long, because Mr. Ed reminded us that in less than 45 minutes NASA was due to launch a rocket from the Kennedy Space Center. The rocket was carrying a GOES (which stands for Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) satellite into orbit, which will be used for weather forecasting. We really wanted to see that, so we hurried back home and out to the dock on the Indian River. We got there at 5:30 PM, and the launch was scheduled for 5:42. Just in time!

But as frequently happens, there was a delay and it was another hour before the rocket lifted off. We spent the time chatting with some of the other folks who were down on the dock to see the show, and watching some manatee and a pod of dolphins swimming around. We also spent quite a bit of time swatting mosquitoes, who didn’t seem to have any problem digging their way through the bug spray we had doused ourselves with. I was kind of ticked off about that because I figure if there are parts of my round body that I can’t reach, it’s not fair that a skeeter can. But they sure found them!

Finally, at 6:42, PM the sky lit up in the distance and it was go time!

rocket-1

For a couple of seconds it looked like a very bright moonrise, but that didn’t last long.

rocket-2

The rocket became a giant fireball hurtling into space, and though I managed to get a few photographs, most of them were blurry. This was about the best I got. And then it was just a tiny speck, disappearing into the darkness of outer space.

rocket-4

If you ever have the opportunity to see a live rocket launch, you really need to take it. It’s an awesome experience.

Today is your last day to enter our latest Free Drawing. This week’s prize is a set of three books by Master Certified RV service technician Dale Lee Sumner that are excellent introductions to RV 12 volt electrical systems, 120 volt RV electrical systems, and RV appliances. While these books won’t make you a qualified RV tech, they will show you the basics of how your rig’s systems operate, how to get the most out of them, and give you some basic maintenance tips. To enter, all you have to do is click on this Free Drawing link or the tab at the top of this page and enter your name in the comments section at the bottom of that page (not this one). Only one entry per person per drawing please, and you must enter with your real name. To prevent spam or multiple entries, the names of cartoon or movie characters are not allowed. The winner will be drawn this evening.

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Thought For The Day – Sometimes those who fly solo have the strongest wings.

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  7 Responses to “Up Early And On The Go”

  1. Nick I am from northern MI and I have found a real good mosquito repellent that we use. Not actually a repellent but a device. It’s called ThermCell. Have it around you and the mosquito’s are gone. I am really impressed with them. Got mine at WalMart for about $40.00………worth every penny as far as I am concerned.

    Here’s what they look like!

    https://www.thermacell.com/products/mosquito-repellents/mosquito-repellers

  2. One man’s treasure is another man’s trash … sounds like the boat was pretty much trash!! That rocket launch …. AWESOME!!

  3. If you don’t already have this site, it gives you live updates when there is a launch. I’ve got it bookmarked on my phone and pull it up on the browser. A bit of a transmission delay but it’s helpful when you’re wondering what’s happening. http://spaceflightnow.com/

    We watched the launch from a dock at KARS Park – not only amazing to see but to hear as well.

  4. The pleasure was mine it was enjoyable to meet Miss Terry an yourself
    the real reasons why I gave you that book is because I know you like to start fishing and kayaking
    just a little south of you is some real good kayaking areas, in that book Photocopy a page use that is a help guide (((unless you have a waterproof case for your phone for Google map))
    You’re going to find that the Indian river rises and falls with the wet and dry season
    Probably the only thing that will be constant is the mosquitoes my understanding is they’re attracted to green shirts
    Having a pontoon boat only limits you to not getting to the interior of the Indian river
    But a PB is a lot better stable platform to Fish from or Bring your lawn chair and cruise the river. North or South
    However if you’re inclined to go with a flat bottom boat get the biggest aluminum john-boat 16 ft+ you can find
    If you kayak or boat anywhere in the Canaveral national Park off the main channel your water is going to be anywhere from 3 – 4 feet to 3- 6 inches
    If you’re out exploring and you’re on Kennedy Parkway all the way down to Haulover cut check out the boat ramps
    Or Mims Route 46 run that east to the river
    When you get close to the east side of the islands ( dredging spoils )it’s just as fun to walk and explore as well. 3 – 6 in, ( really good water shoes are a must)

  5. Back in the late 80’s, I had a night race at Moroso Motorsports Park in West Palm Beach, Florida. After 1st round, they stopped racing and announced to look towards the N.E. as a space shuttle flight was scheduled. As luck would have it, it lifted on schedule on a cloudless nite and the “ball of light” appeared. You could literally hear a pin drop as we all watched with pride, and the “icing on the cake” was a flag post with the American flag in our field of vision. A night I will always remember. Bob

  6. Regarding mosquitos, we volunteered at Brazoria NWR a few years ago. Asked the volunteer coordinator what we should wear and he anything we want but he did recommend a mosquito jacket. Never heard of them, so we googled them and bought them! Wore them every time we were outside. Sure saved us from lots of bites. They were cheap and very light weight. You might want some too!

  7. I second the Thermacell recommendation. Absolutely love mine. It’s not perfect but it really cuts down on the mosquitos, and I am typically prime feeding.

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