TV Good, Internet Bad

 Posted by at 12:15 am  Nick's Blog
Feb 092013
 

We were up bright and early yesterday morning because Dish Network was supposed to send a tech out to figure out why the reception on our bedroom TV was so fuzzy. We knew he would arrive sometime between 8 a.m. and noon, so we were up well before then to be ready for his arrival.

About 10:30 the tech called and said he was on his way, and he arrived a little before 11:00. Actually, not one, but two techs arrived. One was Gus, who installed our original Dish receiver right here at the Orlando Thousand Trails a couple of years ago, and the other fellow was a trainee.

It didn’t take them long to diagnose the problem as a couple of bad coax connectors, which they quickly replaced, and now we have a crystal clear picture on both TVs, front and back. Then Gus made some adjustments to our setup to make it easier to record shows, which was a problem with the previous receiver. Thanks for all your help, Gus.

He also told us about a program in which we can download Blockbuster movies, many of them free, through our CradlePoint wireless router, but he wasn’t familiar enough with how to set it up to get everything to work correctly. The TV could see the router, but would not connect. We have unlimited data on the router, but it is so incredibly slow in most parts of the country that it would probably take a week to download a movie anyway.

As I wrote a while back, last year the Verizon internet was pretty fast here, but this year even the 4G sucks most of the time. Yesterday I was talking to my pal Donna McNicol, who is a parked few streets over from us in the campground, and she is having the same problems, as are several other people I’ve talked to here. It’s a problem we have experienced all over the country and sometimes I think the whole wireless internet system will collapse from all of the computers, cell phones, smartphones, and everything else demanding access to the system. You can only pump so much water through a hose of any diameter, and unless somebody figures out a way to make the hose bigger, it can only get worse.

It’s Saturday, which means it’s time for our weekly Indie author blast. This week’s first featured author is Randy Morris. The Journals of Jacob and Hyde is Randy’s first book in the Jehovah and Hades series, about a normal kid who enjoyed hearing his mother’s bedtime stories. But the stories became shockingly real when he discovered that he was a descendant of Dr. Jekyll, and that he had his own Mr. Hyde living inside him!

Stephen Arseneault is our second featured author, and Stephen’s Sodium sci-fi action/adventure series is quickly becoming a hit with readers. Check out the series and follow the battle as mankind fights to survive, and then pushes out into the stars!

Thought For The Day – I tried sniffing coke once, but the ice cubes stuck in my nose.

Check Out Nick’s E-Books In Our E-Book Store

Nick Russell

  2 Responses to “TV Good, Internet Bad”

  1. We have the free movie download device hooked up and it does take forever to download a movie. The choices aren’t that great either. I promise you aren’t missing out on anything:)

  2. Nick, The U.S. currently ranks No. 23 in internet capability. The companies that provide internet service in the U.S. rank No. 1 in profits of all internet service providers worldwide, and the fees payed by the customers for our 3rd world level internet service are the highest in the world.

    Sorry, I forgot the title of the 2012 book that I read about this only a month or 2 ago – I must be getting old. The book detailed in depth how all the utility companies, banks, and the “financial services” industry have been increasingly screwing all American citizens for the past 30 – 40 years, at a rate that has massively skyrocketed in the 21st century.

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